Scho-ka-kola tinOver the past few years I came across tins of Scho-ka-kola on the German Autobahn (motorway). Knowing that the brand was from before the war, I had bought a pair of tins.

I had read comments on various forums and saw pictures of several tins of Scho-ka-kola. Some of the pictures showed round cardboard boxes. And those cardboard boxes drew my attention. Wouldn’t it be nice to reproduce them, for Living History or Re-enactment events? The only problem at this moment is, where do I find a company who can make a mould to make those cardboard boxes. Maybe I will figure out myself, how to make those boxes in the future. I already made the artwork for it.

Maybe in the future I might even let a tin company make reproductions tins. That would be a perfect addition for your bread bag supply rations.

 

Cardboard Sho-Ka-Kola box

History of Sho-Ka-Kola

Scho-Ka-Kola was created by the firm Hildebrand, Kakao- und Schokoladenfabrik GmbH in 1935 and was introduced at the 1936 Summer Olympics as a “Sport Chocolate.” During World War II, it was referred to as the “Flyer-Chocolate” as it was provided with Luftwaffe rations. During the occupation period, it was also distributed to the German population by the Allies.

The concept of Scho-Ka-Kola is simple, it’s a caffeine enhanced chocolate. They use both coffee and cola nut to boost the stimulant content which is where the name comes from, Schokolade (chocolate), Kaffee (coffee) and Kola(cola).

All kinds of Sho-Ka-Kola tins

In 1969 Dr. Hans Imhoff took over the firm, and also bought Stollwerck AG from Deutsche Bank for distribution. On July 1, 2005, Genuport Trade AG gained all brand and distribution rights to the product. Today it’s made by Sarotti, which is owned by Stollwerk which itself is now owned by international chocolate giant, Barry Callebaut. It’s still made in Berlin and the packaging has changed little over the years.